How To Take Care of the Water In Your Float Tank

So you've got a float tank setup at home with over 200 gallons of water and 800lbs of epsom salt. But now what? How do you honestly keep that much salt water clean and sanitized?

When it comes to float tank water care, it's not as hard as a lot of people to believe it to be. But it's kind of like maintaining a car. If you wait until your tires are bald or forget to upkeep on your oil changes, it makes it a lot harder to get things back on track again.

If you maintain a regular cleaning schedule from the get-go, keeping your float tank water clean and fresh is easy-peasy. Check out the video below to learn more:

In this video our team discusses:

  • The 6 main aspects of water care
  • The difference between the quick water care guide and complete guide 
  • Where to find cleaning products and tools
  • Tips + tricks for easier water care maintenance

Other Resources:

Link to Quick Maintenance Guide 

Link to Complete Water Care Guide

How To Fill Up A Float Tent: Part 2

This is the second video in a two-part video series showing you all the steps that go into filling up a float tent, installing the pumps and cover, and getting the Float Tent ready for your first float. 

In this video our team covers:

  • How to install the filter pumps, tubes, tent cover and door poles.
  • Tips and tricks for the best home install
  • The main differences between the v1.0 and current 1.5 new and improved model of the Float Tent
  • What to do if your tank gets a leak or tear 
  • Tricks for sound-proofing
  • Post-Float relaxation tips


Are you ready to improve your home and life with a Float Tent? Start by requesting a complimentary shipping quote here. Save hundreds of dollars over floating at your annual center and join hundreds of others already enjoying the benefits of floating from home. 

    How To Fill Up A Float Tent: Part 1

    Have you ever wondered what goes in to filling up a Float Tent with 200 gallons of water and 800lbs. of epsom salt? Surprisingly, it's easier than you think and can be done in about an hour! 

    To give you a visual idea of what goes into the process, we did a Facebook LIVE broadcast and filmed our team filling up a Float Tent for use at the new Zen office. In the video, we answer questions live from our audience and also give away some our most valuable tips and secrets. Whether you've been on the fence about buying a Float Tent or are just curious after watching an episode of Netflix's 'Stranger Things', this video is worth checking out. . 

    View the full replay by clicking the play below button below. 

    In this video, our team covers:

    • Tips before getting started
    • Why we include an inline water filter with your purchase
    • Things to consider when choosing the placement of your tank
    • The best ways to mix up the epsom salt
    • Different ways to insulate the bottom of the tank 
    • Where to purchase epsom salt 
    • How often you need to purchase and replace the epsom salt 

    Are you ready to improve your home and life with a Float Tent? Start by requesting a complimentary shipping quote here. Save hundreds of dollars over floating at your annual center and join hundreds of others already enjoying the benefits of floating from home. 

    Two New Products to Enhance Your Float At Home

    If you're signed up to receive our monthly newsletter you might have heard that this week we officially launched two new products to enhance your home floating experience. One is a physical product and one is digital product, both highly requested from our customers and floating community. 


    Introducing, the first guided meditation audio made specifically for floaters. This 30-minute guided meditation is perfect for anyone new to floating, meditation, or if you just have a hard time quieting your mind. And the best part, it's completely Free! Give it a listen and be sure to leave us your feedback. 

    But what good would a guided meditation for floaters be without some way to listen to it underwater? Introducing our other newest product, Float Buds: underwater headphones. For those times when silence is not golden, enjoy the combined benefits of floatation with guided meditation, relaxing audio, and binaural beats.

    Float Buds are 100% waterproof and even act as earplugs during your float. Learn More and Shop Now!

    Here at Zen we're constantly working to improve the Float Tent and your home floating experience and we hope these two items help you to achieve deeper, more meaning floats and enjoy your time in the tank even more than you already do!


    If you have any suggestions or ideas or items that you would like to see us offer in our online shop we welcome your feedback by leaving a comment below or sending us an email at 




    Success Stories: How Floating Can Help Treat ADHD

    A common source of internal stress is Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Recent surveys by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that, 11 percent of children 4 to 17 years old were diagnosed with ADHD in 2011, up from 7.8 percent in 2003.

    Many of these children will carry the disorder into adulthood.

    Essentially, ADHD is a problem of being unable to focus, being overactive, being unable to control impulses, or a combination of these symptoms.

    The remarkable thing is that this this is exactly the description of the habits we are creating with our technology.

    We are training people to have disordered thinking. Though not yet proven, many experts believe that technology has played a role in the rising rates of ADHD.

    Think honestly to yourself…

    How much TV do you watch and do your kids watch on a daily basis….can you really resist the urge to press the “on” button when you know a new episode of your weekly show is about to air?

    What about when you hear your phone long can you go without checking it? Most people would come in at five minutes tops. You might feel like you can control your behavior, but usually habits say otherwise.

    While technology is convenient and may not be the cause ADHD, it could very likely exacerbate a problem that’s already on the rise.


    Floating as a Treatment for ADHD

    There’s one main reason that floating is an ideal solution for ADHD: It helps you stay focused, on task and present, no matter what.

    There’s one main reason that floating is an ideal solution for ADHD: It helps you stay focused, on task and present, no matter what. And for people who deal with the very real symptoms of ADHD on a regular basis, a floating routine might have similar effects.

    Spencer Fossier, owner of NOLA Float Tanks, first floated in 2014. Since then, he’s not only adopted a regular float schedule to deal with symptoms of ADHD and back pain but has also opened his own float center.

    Diagnosed and medicated for ADHD in the fourth grade, Spencer spent years feeling hopeless and misunderstood. Now he says, “It has opened me up immensely.” His symptoms are alleviated, and he chooses to stay off medication.

    However, things didn’t always used to be this way. When Spencer’s ADHD was at it’s worst he recalls fighting and screaming with his parents, punching through walls, and even failing classes. To other people it seemed like he was unable to control himself but to Spencer it felt like everyone was trying to control him to where he felt like he had no personal freedom.  

    Spencer dealt with the symptoms of ADHD all throughout his childhood and into adulthood. It wasn’t until after college that he heard about floating through Joe Rogan and immediately decided to give it a try. Spencer now maintains a regular float practice and floats 2-3 times a week at his center.

    Photo from Nola Float Tanks 

    Photo from Nola Float Tanks 

    Besides helping Spencer with the symptoms of ADHD, he says floating also helped him come to peace with his diagnosis and the struggles he went through as a child. “Whereas before, I kind of was this angry little kid, was just frustrated that no one else got it and I was just a victim of situations. More than anything else, floating has helped me realize I'm just responsible for my own life and decisions.  And not only that, but I'm not responsible for the way that other people react to me.”

    He says that regardless of why you’re doing it, you should keep an open mind and that every float is different, even for him. “Everyone needs to do it,” he says. “It's a life-changing experience. You will learn more about yourself in those forty-five minutes to an hour than most people have ever sat down to think about in their entire lives.”

    Whether you suffer from ADHD or simply the disordered thinking of an overloaded society, floating can help you move to a more peaceful place.



    Pieces of this story were taken from The Float Tank Cure and repurposed for the use of this post.


    About Spencer Fossier

    Spencer is the owner of NOLA Float Tanks, which he opened after floating at Float Houston last summer. What initially drew Spencer to the tanks was the alternative treatment for ADHD, which he had been diagnosed and medicated within 4th grade. After using the tanks to center his mental state, Spencer noticed that he became more balanced in his external musculature.

    By the time of the conference, Spencer will be CHEK Golf Specialist certified which he is going to use to incorporate float tanks as physical therapy. He suffers from back pain like many others and would like to help himself and as many other people as possible to work through these physical symptoms of stress.


    Posted on August 22, 2016 and filed under Floating Success Stories.

    6 Signs That It's Time to Take a Break

    Ever heard the saying, "Listen to your body, it's smarter than you."

    Well, there's a lot of truth behind this simple phrase. While your mind is not always the most honest with you, your body is stays truthful and cannot tell a lie. 

    When we need to sleep, we yawn and feel tired. When we need to be refueled, our belly growls and we feel hungry.When we need to recover, our body aches and we feel stiff. 

    Same thing goes for when your body needs recharging–it lets you know. Here are 6 clear signs that it's time for you to relax and give your body a rest: 


    1. High anxiety

    Anxiety comes in all different forms but racing thoughts, feeling distracted, and lack of sleep are just a few of the common side affects. When you're anxious, it's simply a sign of your body telling you that you need to calm down. While meditation can be an easy and accessible solution to this, it sometimes feels impossible to focus your mind when you're anxious. This is why floating in a sensory deprivation tank is so powerful, because it creates the most ideal environment to achieve deep levels of meditation and relaxation.  


    2. You're feeling stuck creatively

    Struggling to get your creative juices floating? Whether you're working on a post for your blog or just helping your child with their upcoming art assignment, lack of creativity can often be a sign that you have too much on your mind. Sometimes all it takes is an hour to disconnect with the world and reconnect with yourself to get the creativity flowing again. 

    Also check out: How Floating Helped Me Overcome Writer's Block


    3. Distracted or restless

    We've all had those days at work where there's a big project that needs to get done but you just can't seem to stop pacing around the office. You're restless, and antsy, and nothing can get you to focus. It's okay to be distracted every once in a while, but if you've found it happening more than usual it may be time press pause and reset your mind. Float therapy is a excellent technique that many have found to improve concentration because it forces you to literally focus on one thing and removes all possible distractions. 


    4. Your muscles are tense

    When the body is stressed your muscles can become tense. It’s an automatic response and your body’s way of guarding against injury and pain. While it's most common for your muscles to tighten in your upper back, neck and shoulders but it could happen in any parts of your body and is a sign that those muscles need some extra care. And what could possibly be better than soaking your muscles in 800lbs. of epsom salt?  


    5. Lack of motivation or negative thinking

    If you find yourself sinking down in the dirt, there's no better time to (literally) float it out. The primary cause of unhappiness or negative thoughts is never the situation itself, but your thoughts about the situation. Often times you just need to take a step back in order to shift your mindset into the right place and the elimination of external stimuli in a float tank it produces chemical changes in the body that allow for clarity of thought. 


    6. Fuzzy memory

    Like a plane needs fuel, your brain needs sleep, and neither will run for very long on empty. Studies show that among other things, your body uses sleep to stabilize chemical imbalances and to process the memories and knowledge that you've gathered throughout the day.  If you're having trouble remembering details it could be a sign that you need to rest your mind. While it may be hard to squeeze in a few extra hours of sleep, it's been said that floating for one hour is equivalent to four hours of sleep. 


    Learn more about how float therapy can help you relax, refresh and rejuvenate in our Free Float 101 Online Course!

    Posted on August 17, 2016 and filed under Floating Benefits, Health & Wellness.

    The Anxiety Podcast: Climbing The Anxiety Mountain & Floating Away

    Hosted by Tim JP Collins, The Anxiety Podcast is a show to support everyone suffering with Anxiety, stress and panic attacks. Tim suffered with Anxiety and panic attacks and has changed his life to recover and now supports others in doing the same.

    This unique show isn't just about coping, it's about moving past Anxiety and fear to live the life you were destined for. Each week Tim interviews people that have stories that you will be able to relate to.

    The interviews are raw, real and vulnerable and people share what's really going on for them. Each week Tim will also share a personal story, skill or coping strategy for you to put into practice right away! 

    In Episode #108 of The Anxiety Podcast our very own cofounder, Shane Stott, shares about his own personal struggle with anxiety and what he did to move past it.  He also talks about his journey and how he started a float tank business after finding it so beneficial. 


    In this particular episode you will learn:

    - How Shane drank heavily and due to that and lack of sleep began having panic attacks

    - How Shane went to the church of scientology when he was desperate for help

    - How guided meditation was very useful for Shane in terms of overcoming anxiety

    - What Shane's experience was like trying to get off of his medication

    - How Shane got involved in his family business and then started his float tank business

    - How after putting float tanks online he got a following from others looking to build float tanks at home

    - What a float tank does for people with anxiety

    - We discuss how anxiety still shows up for us today

    Listen to the full interview to hear all the details!



    Do you struggle with anxiety and/or have a positive experiencing using floatation therapy? We would love hear from you in the comments below!


    Posted on July 26, 2016 and filed under Floating Success Stories.

    An Inspiring Story About Using Float Therapy to Overcome Writer's Block

    Imagine a noisy classroom. The bell just rang as the students rush to their seats. It's a Monday morning so the kids have a lot to chatter about.

    Today the teacher decides to play a little experiment. She puts on a calm, meditative audio in the mist of all the chatter and she asks herself, "how long will it take for them to hear the music?" 

    Minutes go by and she watches the the evolution of the classroom chatter. You'd think the chatter would stop and the students would realize something different but to her surprise, they still don't amp down the chatter even ten minutes after the start of class.

    As the minutes pass, some of the students closer to the speakers start to expend their built up energy and suddenly notice the calming music playing from the speakers. Unfamiliar to the students, the sound sounds interesting, foreign and undeniably therapeutic. One by one the students nudge each other and direct their classmates attention to the sounds. As each student tunes in, the once non-existent sound begins to crescendo into a loud harmonizing wave of peace.

    She begins class and notices that those ten minutes of calmness led to a more productive hour lecture. The students she finds were more attentive and responded in a more center way, instead of their usual sporadic ways. 

    Now imagine this classroom represents your mind. The students represent our daily mental chatter that often stops us from observing our surroundings more fully, each conversation distracting us from the peace that dwells within. The soothing nature of floating in a warm silent floatation tank can be related to the teacher who is trying to bring the classrooms attention to this wave of bliss.

    You may be thinking, could one hour of my day lead to more production and energy for the next 15 hours you spend awake? From my experience, the answer is 100% yes.

    At the time when I first decided to float, I was a 19 years old with years of anxiety. I was always very gifted in the creative arts but a string of life set backs had me with a lot of questions that I looked to my mind to solve.

    During this period, it was very hard for me to come up with new lyrics, it was like the chatter within kept me from tapping into my creative source. I decided to try out floating and was lucky enough to get free float time for handing out flyers down the city blocks for an amazing float center named Halcyon Floats located in Philadelphia.

    I floated in the tank for about 90 minutes but didn't really get settled until 60 minutes in. At that point I found myself hugging the warmness of the experience and basking in the space, very much in the moment. After hearing the music underwater, I said to myself, "was this really worth it?".

    The moment I opened the door and stepped into the shower it was clear to me it was worth every second.

    I noticed a fluid stream of observance emanating from my being and a calmness that rivaled nothing else. My heart felt lighter and my motions synched well with this feeling I had. After getting dressed, I went to the counter to talk to the owner of the center and noticed my anxiety levels dropped exponentially, something that no previous forms of therapy seemed to manage.

    Now, here's the icing on the cake. As I drove back home calm and relaxed, in my mind I began to free verse and came up with a new song concepts and lyrics! This one session seemed to have a lasting after glow that stabilized my psyche for the rest of the work week. 

    If had to sum up my experience in one sentence it would be, "Quiet down the classroom and tune into the the music in the background". 

    7 Ways to Make Your Post-Float Glow Last For Longer

    Ahh. That's exactly what I needed.

    Like a cold beer on a hot summer day, the effects of floating can satisfy both your physical and emotional needs. But how frustrating is it when you can feel your tension and anxiety start to return the moment you get done and step outside the tank? 

    All it takes is one annoying email from your boss to stress you out and raise your blood pressure - which is what you just spent an hour trying to bring down. 

    The next time you decide to invest an hour of your time to yourself, take these simple steps to ensure that your post-float glow will last as long as possible:

    1. Schedule Post-Float Relaxation Time

    Although sometimes the only hour you may have is during your lunch break at work, scheduling even an extra 5-10 additional minutes after your float to let your mind refocus can make a huge difference. Instead of rushing off to your next task, let your mind ease it's way back into the real world by giving it just a few extra minutes after each session. 


    2. Ease Back Into Technology

    The last thing you need after an hour of relaxation is to read about your neighbor's latest drama on Facebook or listen to radio clip about our failing economy. When it comes to technology immediately after your float, either shut it off or turn the volume down. 


    3. Stay Hydrated & Watch What You Eat

    Floating is not only therapeutic but it's also a great tool for detoxifying your body. Drinking water helps to continue flushing out any toxins in the body. Also, try and avoid drinks such as coffee or soda, which can actually dehydrate you more. 

    Then there's the saying, "you are what you eat." Therefore, after a float when you are feeling refreshed and energized it's best to eat healthy foods that support your mood, rather than eating a candy bar that's filled with sugar and is bound to make your mind crash and body feel sluggish. 


    4. Avoid Strenuous Activity

    For the next day to two, try and take it easy to preserve that energized and refreshed feeling. If possible, avoid hiking or long distance running and instead try incorporating some yoga or stretching to reconnect with your body and mind. 


    5. Journal and Take Time to Reflect

    It's important to acknowledge and write down how you're feeling for the next couple of days after your float session. Maybe you finally got a good night's sleep for the first time in a while, or you've noticed an improvement in your overall mood. Taking time to journal and reflect on your feelings will help you determine what's working in your floating routine (and maybe even what's not). 

    Check Out: 4 Ways Keeping A Journal Can Enhance Your Floats


    6. Build On Your Momentum

    Learning to calm your mind and let go is a discipline that takes time and practice. By combining floating with other relaxation techniques at home such as deep breathing or guided meditations, you can begin take your relaxation to the next level and may even be able to achieve a feeling similar to a float outside of the tank. 


    7. Invest In More Regular Floats

    With the availability of float centers and the Zen Float Tent, there's no excuse not to incorporate floating more regularly into your routine.  Not to mention that the effects of floating are cumulative — the more often you float, the better it is for you!

    We hope these tips help you to extend your post-float bliss, allowing the wonderful effects of floating to carry over into your every day life. 


    Interested in taking your float practice to the next level? There are already thousands of people seeing incredible results from floating more regularly at home and you could be one of them too! Download a copy of The Ultimate Float Tank Buying Guide and learn about all the considerations that go into buying a float tank for your home. 

    Posted on June 15, 2016 and filed under Floating Tips & Tricks.

    6 Myths About Floating That You Should Stop Believing Right Now

    Just hearing the words "sensory deprivation" or "isolation tank" is all it takes to make some people instantly break into a cold sweat and with all the misrepresentation about it in press and media, it's no wonder why so many people have misconstrued ideas about the world of floating. 

    Today, we're here to put all those misconceptions to rest. Get it? (R.E.S.T. = Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy, the clinical term for floating.)  Because floating is one of the greatest tools that exists for relaxation, pain management, and overall health & wellness and we truly believe everyone deserves to soak up the benefits of the tank. 

    Myth #1 - "I can't swim, so I definitely can't float"

    According to TIME Magazine about 50% of Americans don't know how to swim but the great news is that 100% of people can float. Here's why: 

    Float tanks contain anywhere between 800 to 1000 lbs of epsom salt but are only filled with about 10-12 inches of water. The density of the water creates a uniquely buoyant environment that makes it pretty much impossible NOT to float, even if you were to fall asleep mid-float. Floating is safe enough that kids can float as young as ages 10-12 with parental guidance. 


    Myth #2 - "Sensory Deprivation is used for torture"

    You know how there's good pain and bad pain? Good pain like when you're sore after a nice workout? Well, the same thing could be said for deprivation therapy. 

    There's the good kind like you see in hundreds of float spa's around the country and hear Joe Rogan raving about on his podcast. Then there's the bad kind that involves being locked in a dark room for weeks or months on end, which is actually meant to be torturous. 

    If used for the right reasons, sensory deprivation can be one of the most therapeutic and relaxing experiences for both the mind and body. 


    Myth #3 - "Floating in a tank isn't any different than floating in my bathtub, pool, or the ocean" 

    Technically, you can float anywhere there's enough room and water. However, the hard part is recreating a true sensory deprivation environment. 

    Even though the ocean contains salt water, it's not nearly as saturated as the water in the float tank. Meaning, you can still float but not nearly as easily or peacefully. It's also hard to completely rid light and sound in anywhere other than a fully enclosed environment, which is necessary in order to shut off your mind. Last but not least, it's hard to regulate water temperature in any other environment but a float tank and half the magic lies in having the your skin disappear into the feeling of the water. No hot tub, pool, or water formation can compare. 


    Myth #4 - "I can't float if I'm claustrophobic/have a fear of the dark"

    Doing something for the first time (and sometimes even the second time) is always a little nerve racking, especially when you're in a new environment. However, the important thing to remember is floating in a sensory deprivation tank is completely safe so it's up to you to approach each float session with an open mind

    It's completely normal to float with the light on or with music for the first 1-5 sessions until you feel comfortable enough to truly relax and let go of control. But never forget, YOU ARE IN CONTROL the entire time. Can't handle the entire 60 minutes? You are welcome to hop out of the tank at any point. Prefer to float with the door open and cracked and the lights on? That's totally okay. 

    They say life begins at the end of your comfort zone, right? Don't afraid to step outside of your comfort zone a little and step into the tank. 


    Myth #5 - "Float tanks aren't very clean"

    There are several different types of float tanks on the market, all of which come with some sort of filtration system to keep the water sanitized. Our Float Tent, for example, uses two filters that clean the water with UV light and filter out any debris, hair, etc and is always running when the tank is not use. On top of this high concentration hydrogen peroxide is often used to help sanitize the water inside of float tanks along with regular maintenance and cleaning.


    Myth #6 - "People see things inside of the tank/hallucinate"

    Though you may hear of friends or people online that claim to have hallucinations inside of the tank while being sober, it's unlikely that you will experience something out of this world. What does happen is that during a float your brain enter's into the Theta state, which takes your mind into to a slower, almost dream-like state. This state is commonly experienced by the average person just before they drift into a deep sleep. 


    This post is sponsored by our friends over at Check them out to find float tank locations worldwide, save with Float Saver deals, read about float tanks, vids and more!

    Posted on May 17, 2016 and filed under Floating Philosophy, Floating Tips & Tricks.

    Finding Your Float Habit (A Sneak Peak Into Our FREE Float 101 eCourse)

    How does anyone know how much they should float? It's a common question that we get A LOT.  

    Once a month? Once a week? Once a day? 

    Let's just say, there are many variables and many different reasons to float. In this post I'm going to break down the different reasons to float, and explain good frequency to float in each.


    Finding Your Float Habit


    1. Spiritual Exploration

    What can I say? As often as possible. The majority of home floaters are after this benefit, and they float multiple times a week. This is too personal to offer a frequency, you'll just know.  


    2. Stress Relief

    I float for stress relief and I find that twice a week is a great frequency. I float Monday mornings to start my week on the right foot, and Friday to wrap the week up and wind down for the weekend. This could also be situational, so if you find you're going through a stressful time you float more, and if things are peaceful you can back off. 

    Also read: Figuring Out Your Optimal Float Time


    3. Physical Pain Relief

    Two things here. First if you're floating for relief from an injury you can float as needed, much like you would see a chiropractor. When the pain resides, you could quit floating. Second, if you're floating from chronic pain or a disorder like Fibromyalgia, you're going to want to float as often as possible, or as often as needed. Because chronic pain is so personal, it's hard to give a frequency. 


    4. Improve Sleep 

    If you're looking to improve your sleep through floating you can do it with the MED (minimum effective dose). If you can get the sleep you want by floating every other week, do it. You may get better at the relaxation response and find you don't need to float to keep the skills you've learned. Or you may find yourself so worked up that you need to float weekly to keep that good sleep. Whatever the habit it, just shoot for the MED. 


    5. Anxiety Relief 

    As often as possible and then some. I battle anxiety and although it's not a big deal right now for me, it has a way of creeping up. You'll need to float as often as possible until you find relief, and then get on a maintenance program. So many times with anxiety I've started to feel better and quit my healthy habits only to wind back up in a panic attack. Always maintain with a regular float even if you feel  you don't need it. Maybe that's weekly, or monthly, you will know. 


    6. Depression Relief

    Floating will not cure your depression, it will only aid you in relieving it as a healthy habit, that is why having a regular float is a good plan. Shoot for at least monthly, hopefully more. There are other huge factors with depression like eating, staying fit, healthy relationships, and a healthy psychology. You will need to dive into each, and mix floating in where you feel the need. Floating can be a powerful tool to help you. 


    7. Athletic Performance

    This would definitely fall under the as needed column. You may need to float to recover from a long run, to ease your muscles from weight lifting, or to relax after a hard game. Either way, you will be floating as needed. Same goes for visualization, go as much as you need to for what you're after. You will be your own floating expert. 


    8. Intake Overload

    This has the same prescription as stress relief. I find that twice a week is a great frequency. I float Monday mornings to start my week on the right foot, and Friday to wrap the week up and wind down for the weekend. Keeping the habit even when you feel good and not overloaded will be the key. 


    Note: I am not a doctor, you must seek out professional advice for any new health practice. I am speaking from experience with anxiety, depression, stress, and overload. These are my opinions. 

    Note 2: If you're floating more than a few times a month, having your own tank could save you TONS of money. Just calculate the amount of floats you will likely have per year and times by 50. This will give you your yearly spend on floating. If it's over $2,500 and you want a tank in your home the most affordable option is the Zen Float Tent. 


    This post was taken from our Float 101 eCourse: a 10-Day Email Course about all things floating related. Click below to sign up for FREE today!

    Posted on April 13, 2016 and filed under Floating Tips & Tricks.

    April Favorite Floater - Mike Barcomb

    Name: Mike Barcomb

    Location: Plattsburgh, NY

    Length of time you've been floating at home:  1.5 years 

    What made you get into floating and why do you love it?

    Like so many others, I originally got into floating because I heard Joe Rogan talk about it on his podcast.  The closest float center to me at the time was in Montreal, so I made an appointment to float and made the trip to give it a try.  A year and a half after my one float, I heard about the Zen Float tank and bought one.  To this day, I’ve only had one float session outside of my home.  

    I’m a Ph.D. student, business owner, college instructor, and father of two in a bilingual household.  Needless to say, it’s really important for me to take good care of my body and mind, and I’ve grown to appreciate the give and take relationship between the two.  Before floating, I knew my mind could strain my body, but I never knew how much the tension in my body was straining my mind.  I have found that floating hits the reset button on my body, which allows my mind to relax.  My relaxed mind then keeps my body relaxed, so, in short, I’d say the whole process is incredibly cyclical.  

    Any cool experiences floating that you want to share? 

    The first time I knew there was more to floating was when I went wakeboarding about five months after my first float.  When I fell, I felt like I was more comfortable in the water than I had ever been— I was able to just relax and enjoy being in the water.  Experiences like this have continued, and even though I don’t practice swimming, I somehow feel like a better swimmer than I’ve ever been.  In short, I am increasingly becoming aware of my coexistence with water, which I think is a pretty cool discovery at age 32.    

    Floating for me really changed once I got over the “I’m going to have a psychedelic experience” view of floating.  It took me about 20 floats to get beyond this limited view, and the whole thing became increasingly expansive for me when I started viewing floating more like relaxing on a comfortable couch.  Similar to the rest of life, a lot of behavior has to be unlearned before true relaxation becomes a possibility.  In short, floating at home has helped me unlearn a lot of not-so-great tendencies I was completely unaware of beforehand.    

    Any tips,tricks, or other advice you would share with other fellow floaters or Zen Tent owners. 

    So many people get annoyed when they have weeds in their garden, but it’s all part of having a garden.  Over time, you start to appreciate weeds as part of the process.  Similarly, there are a lot of “weeds” when it comes to maintaining a float tank (e.g., water level, filter bag, H202, pH, temperature, etc.).  This was really frustrating for me at first, and I wished I had a more “hands-off” system.  

    While it took me a little while to learn how to balance everything, I think my initial effort in learning how maintain my tank has made floating that much more in synch for me. Floating is great, but floating in the conditions that I crafted is even better.  

    Lastly, my Zen float tent is part of my home.  My tank is always just out of the corner of my eye, whether I am teaching online, doing research, or writing.  Because I’ve experienced so many benefits, I hope to integrate floating into research and various learning environments in the future.  At this point, floating is completely integrated into my work and life, and I’d like to see others enjoy these same benefits.

    Posted on April 4, 2016 and filed under Floating Success Stories.

    Floating and the Red Carpet

    A couple of weeks ago our company had a cool opportunity to go and setup a Float Tent on the red carpet in Hollywood, for E! Online's Live From the Red Carpet Oscars 2016 show. It was live to millions and we were beyond excited to get to show our product off on National Television for the very first time.

    To represent our company we sent our co founder, Shane, and Jaymie, our head of marketing, to talk about our product and demonstrate how it works. 

    Watch the clip below for a full replay of the segment:


    If you haven't tried floating yet, what's stopping you? Book a float now at a center near you.

    Or find out more about our home float tank setup by clicking here. 

    Posted on March 22, 2016 and filed under Behind the Scenes.

    February Favorite Floater - Dann D.

    Name: Dann D.

    Location: Philadelphia, PA

    Length of time you've been floating at home:

    I have been floating at home for 2 months now with dozens of home floats in my Zen Tent under my belt. My journey with floating started almost a year ago, with 100+ hours in various tanks and pods so far.

    How did you first hear about floating  and why do you love it?

    I encountered a float spa owner at a local small business event who introduced me on flotation therapy and sensory deprivation.  After further research and having been somewhat aware of the practice from listening to Joe Rogan's podcast I was increasingly intrigued .  

    Having been a long time sufferer of anxiety and stress management, I have tried hypnotism, acupuncture,  prayer, meditation and medication, but still struggled; so I decided to give floating a try. 

    After my first float I wasn't sure I did "it" right.  My mind was a ping pong ball bouncing from thought to thought.  Eventually having settled in to a comfortable position the thoughts blurred together and an overwhelming calm took hold.  Upon emerging from my float I found my 90 minutes soared by and felt aware of the same problems and thoughts I went into the tank with, only now I was okay with everything.  It was an amazing feeling, as I said before I wasn't sure I "did it" right, but I felt the urge to immediately return.  From here, each float got deeper and deeper and I started floating for 2+ hour sessions increasing to multiple times a week.

    Any cool experiences floating that you want to share?

    As a User Experience Designer/ Digital Strategist and performing DJ, I float now before performances, presentations and before I work on my designs or music. I consume media and information constantly and floating has been the only tool to "turn it all off".  Before I owned the zen float tent I had been spending a good deal of time floating at the best local float spa, Flotation Philly. I began floating in the mornings going into the tank with design requirements and ideas....and things got deeper and deeper....this is when I knew I needed my own tank.

    Dann getting ready to fill up his tent with 800lbs of epsom salt

    Dann getting ready to fill up his tent with 800lbs of epsom salt

    My Best Float Ever: 

    Once during a time of extreme stress, feeling overwhelmed and suffering from total creative block, I embarked on a 4 hour float in a friend's escape pod.  During this session I had to emerge from the tank to sketch out the ideas and the list of "to do's" that magically seemed to surface in my head.  Design ideas I hadn't considered, people I needed to reach out to, where I misplaced several belongings I had been looking for...I had tapped into some amazing thoughts and the clarity flowed like a fire hose.  

    I emerged with a goal of creating a variety of mobile and IT related tools to enhance the experience and progress of Floating for floaters of all walks of life, which I will be socializing with ZenFloat Co. and other members of the float community later this year. 

    During this float I literally sorted and swiped through the thoughts in my head. Subconsciously I developed a business idea that I feel will be my calling or give back to the floating community and will help empower floaters to maximize their experience and journey in floating.  

    Dann's Float Tent in his basement which he nows refers to as his "Zen-ment"

    Dann's Float Tent in his basement which he nows refers to as his "Zen-ment"

    Any tips, tricks, or advice you would share with other fellow floaters or Zen Tent owners. 

    Try floating at a float spa first, and try it a few times.  At that point you'll have an idea whether this is a tool for you or not.  Worst case scenario you'll have some extremely restful nights sleep. 

    If you find like I did, that you needed more access and flexibility to explore your thoughts, then the Zen Tent may be for you.  Shipping was easy, the team at Zen are really good people, and within a few weeks you can take floating to a whole new level in the comfort of your home.

    The tent is not a mass produced Amazon item, but is of really high quality and the maker's care about their product and customers.  As a matter of fact, more care was put into the design of this product because its not such a mass produced item.  Set up from start to float was a weekend, overall the tent is pretty much plug and play, which is why I opted to by from Zen rather than build a DIY.  I advise taking your time and prepping your space accordingly so you can navigate around, clean, and maintain your tent with ease.  Plan it out correctly so your environment is as complementary to a float tank as possible...Mine is in my basement. which is my Zen-ment now!

    Start slow... all of a sudden I had my own float tank!  It took a good deal of floats to settle into the fact that this was my tank, and not to be fixated on maintenance and adjustments.  The tent does require water maintenance and minor adjustments from time to time, over the course of your first several floats you feel safe, you feel secure, you feel proud of you tank!  That's when the fun begins!  I haven't faced any major concerns or negatives I can speak to.  

    Experiment with float times - I have floated at literally all hours, but have found personally I am able to get the most benefit from my floats in the morning and early day before any coffee or much stimulus.  Night time floats often lead me to be very mentally alert after, but I have friend who feel the opposite.  I encourage you to find what works best for you.  I typically float pre-week to prepare, mid week to be alone with my thoughts and relax me, and end of week to review my week and set myself up for a more relaxed and productive weekend.

    I agreed to be a favorite floater because this product is an absolute game changer and I highly recommend it and believe in it!  It has been the most amazing tool for self exploration and improvement.  I highly value the product and the team and often speak to them personally as they are very hands on and just great people who are into floating and care...I highly recommend floating and in particular the Zen Float Tent to offset the demands and overstimulate in  all of our busy lives.

    Thank you Shane, Sean, and the Zen crew for all you have done for floating and for me personally!



    Posted on February 16, 2016 and filed under Floating Success Stories.

    January Favorite Floater - George Gow

    Name: George GOW

    Location: Nanaimo, BC

    Length of time you've been floating at home: Since May 2015

    What made you get into floating and why do you love it?

    I was a Police Officer for many years and with both work related accidents and sporting accidents, my body is a wreck.  Due to my conditions, my 62 year old mind is stuck in an 80 year olds body.

    Prior to floating, I would get massages, acupuncture, and treatments of many other disciplines in regards to recovery/accident and I always found it cutting into my time.  But with the float tent, it is conveniently done at home and there is no driving back and forth.

    I have not had any other treatments this year and that is entirely because of floating.

    Any cool experiences floating that you want to share?

    Within seconds of entry, I am totally pain free. And when I leave the tank I can feel good for hours. 

    George's Zen Room


    Any tips,tricks, or advice you would share with other fellow floaters or Zen Tent owners.

    Try to use the tent as often as possible!

    It has taken me a very long time to master relaxing for more than an hour. I was never able to meditate, and always found I was too busy...but it's the best feeling ever to hear ones' heart beat. 

    It's funny that one can watch tv for hours, yet relaxing and meditating seems like a chore.





    Posted on January 11, 2016 and filed under Floating Success Stories.

    Floating with Justin Feinstein

    We recently had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Justin Feinstein, Director of the Float Clinic and Research Center (FCRC) at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research. The FCRC’s mission is to investigate the effects of floatation on both the body and the brain, as well as explore its potential as a therapeutic treatment for promoting mental health and healing in patients who suffer from conditions such as anxiety, addiction, and anorexia.

    In our interview, Justin tells us how he first heard about floating and shares some of his research and insight on how floating can help alleviate stress and anxiety.


    How did you first hear about floating?

    I was working at a neuroscience laboratory at Caltech. This serendipitously happens to be the same place that John C. Lilly went for his undergraduate degree about 75 years before I was there. But basically, for the last 15 years I had studied neuroscience and I’d been very interested in consciousness and very interested in subjective emotion and feeling states. But in particular I’ve been focused on anxiety, both for personal reasons and my career, with an eye towards how we can alleviate anxiety.

    When I was in the lab at Caltech working with patients, one of the research assistants who shared an office with me at the time, came to me on a Monday and over the weekend she had just had her first float. At the time I had never even heard of what a float tank was. She preceded to tell me over the next several hours with great drama how intense and powerful this first float was for her. I listened with great curiosity because she had been describing something I had been interested in almost my entire life.

    What she was describing to me was what’s known in our field as interoception. The idea is how to access what’s happening in our inner body. It really brings to bare the idea that inside all of us is a pathway into our brain that provides signals about the internal milieu of our body. It provides signals about the heart beating, the blood pulsating, your lungs and respiration, it provides signals about the immune system and it provides signals from the gut. And all these various signals come into the brain through a dedicated pathway. This interoceptive pathway had been my focus of research for many years dating back to the early 2000’s.

    When she was describing her first float to me it became clear to me, even though she didn’t use those words, that what she was accessing was her interoceptive self. What was really interesting to me is that at the same time I was hearing this story I was learning about the primary disruption to this same pathway in patients who suffered from anxiety disorder. There’s something about this interoceptive pathway that’s critical for anxiety, it seems to be dysregulated in anxiety disorders. When you float, it provides a sneak peak into this pathway in a way that you could never access outside of a float.

    She continued to describe how liberated she felt after her first float and I was to be honest, both scared and fascinated. The fascination because of everything I just talked about but the fear because I knew I had to try this.

    How did you feel after your first float?

    I think a lot of my first float was pure novelty. Everything was new…. from the sensation of no gravity–to being able to feel my heart beating in such an intense way–to letting my physiological systems come down to an all time low. I definitely felt relaxed but at the same time had my mind turning. As soon as I stepped out of the float tank, the first thing I wanted to do is figure out how I could buy one of these to start doing research with it.


    How did you transition into actually doing research on floating?

    It wasn’t until my second or third float that I achieved a state of pure sensory awareness, unlike anything I’d ever obtained before meditating outside of the float tank. At that moment in the tank I felt total bliss and it was really with moments like these, and repeated moments like these, that I realized how powerful this environment is. I knew I needed to pursue floating as a line of research.

    I was able to team up with my original mentor from when I was a freshman in college at UCSD named Dr. Martin Paulus. Together, we did a lot of work during my time at UCSD and one area we had a lot of success with was studying the concept of interoception.

    Around the same time that I was discovering floating as technique, Dr. Paulus had been offered the position as the scientific director of this institute that had recently opened in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I was collaborating with him on a project I was working on at Caltech and was visiting him in San Diego when I mentioned some of my experiences using float tanks. He started talking to me about this opportunity at LIBR and it was over the course of that week that we put our heads together and realized how ideal this situation was for a few reasons. We were able to reconnect and reunite after a decade of not working together, we had the opportunity to pursue a novel line of research that no one else in the neuroscience community has focused on, and better than that, we knew that the core mission for LIBR was to think outside of the box to come up with brand new novel treatments for mental illness.  In this case, we actually went inside the box because we decided to pursue floating as a treatment. I can’t emphasize how serendipitous all of this was.

    Pictured third from the right is Dr. Justin Feinstein and his team of LIBR researchers

    Why do you think floating alleviates the negative symptoms of stress?

    I think there are several reasons but two in particular. First off, our brain is wired in such a way to be reflexively triggered by the outer world. We’re living in the midst of an anxiety epidemic and a lot of this is driven by our technology. Smartphones in particular have taken off in such a way that almost every culture and every country has these now. It gives us instant connectivity and it provides us with a slew of conveniences that we never used to have.

    What our society doesn’t realize though is that every time we get pinged with a new text message, or a new email, or a new phone call or every time we get some update on our Facebook or Twitter, it’s setting off a cascade of events in our brain that creates a state of temporary stress.

    We become addicted to this, to a point where we aren’t able to leave our phones behind us or disconnect from them in any way, shape or form. It’s affecting our sleep patterns. It’s affecting our ability to socialize and our ability to communicate in the real world rather than the virtual world. It’s affecting us because people are now living in a constant state of connectivity.

    So, one of the reasons I think floating helps stress is because it's the ultimate form of disconnection. It allows your brain to literally go into a state of rest without having any distractions whatsoever from the external world.

    The second thing is that stress isn’t just in the brain. It’s physiological, it's through the entire body. One of the most strong and powerful results of the past research into floating is the profound physiological effects that floating has on the body.

    We’ve created equipment here at LIBR to study this. We have devices to measure things like blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, EEG, movement, and what we’re finding across all of these measures is that you are entering into a state of absolute relaxation. Your blood pressure is going way down, your respiration is going way down, your heart rate is going down. So you’re really entering into a physiological state of relaxation, which is the exact opposite of the state of stress. Floating doesn’t only affect the brain.  It has profound effects on the body as well.

    In your professional opinion, what would be the benefits of being able to float at home?

    It would certainly provide that access (to floating) that a lot of people are missing. Having the ability to float at home is so beneficial, especially for clinical populations who can do this on a regular basis. It can help them better control their symptoms and also help them achieve the relief and benefits that they really need.


    In summary, the future of floating is bright. We find it very encouraging that research both old and new are focusing on the idea of float therapy as a treatment not only on stress and anxiety, but also for overall health and wellness.  We also look forward to Dr. Feinstein’s research, more of which he will present at the 2016 Float Conference next August.



    5 Tank Hacks to Consider for Winter Time

    Cold temperatures outside certainly make it harder to maintain the perfect water and room temperatures that we all like to float in, but that's no reason to let the winter weather get you down. Luckily, there are a quite a few easy and inexpensive ways to keep your heating costs low during the winter months.  

    Try these tips and techniques to help fight off the cold and keep your float tank running at optimal performance this winter: 


    1. Insulate and Cover Your Windows

    Windows are one of the easiest places for heat to escape in your home and nothing is worse than a cold float room. Covering your windows with space blankets or bubble wrap can go a long way in keeping your existing heat indoors and outside air outdoors. 

    2. Insulate the Outside of the Tank

    The best way to keep your float tank heated is by stopping the heat from escaping in the first place. Try wrapping a few mylar thermal blankets around your tank to keep more heat in. Besides preserving heat, the blankets give your tank a retro, futuristic look. 

    3. Insulate Underneath the Tank

    Rugs and carpets help keep heat from escaping through your flooring, especially if your float tank is on concrete or tile. Some other materials we recommend using to insulate underneath your tank are rubber padding, carpet padding, vinyl mats, interlocking foam mats, or plywood. 

    4. Make Sure Your Air Vents Are Open and Directed Properly

    It's common during the summer to close the air vents in your float room to keep cool air out. However, once you've switched from using cool air to heated air in your home, you'll want to make sure to re-open up the vents to allow the warm air to flow in. 

    The one thing to lookout for is to not point the air vent directly at the tank (the warm air tends to come in through the vents of the float tent and throws off the temperature inside the tank). You may be able to redirect the air by adjusting the vent or building a funnel out of cardboard like pictured below.  

    5. If All Else Fails, Use Space Heaters

    A decent space heater can be found online or at local Walmart or Target for less than $100 and the nice thing about space heaters is they do not have to be in use at all times. Try turning on the heater an hour or two before you float and then turning it off again once you are done. This won't use up too much electricity but will help in keeping your float room close to the ideal temperature of about 78 degrees while in session. 

    Posted on December 14, 2015 and filed under Zen Float Tent Resources.

    November Favorite Floater - Elbert Hartman

    Name: Elbert Hartman

    Location:  Longmont, CO

    Length of time you've been floating at home:  Floating at home since October, 2015. Floating at float centers since January 2015.

    What made you get into floating and why do you love it?  

    The Week magazine featured an article about floating that intrigued me and so I sought out floating to restore myself emotionally through my current life stressors.  

    Floating has exceeded my expectations and has become a facilitator in propelling my life forward at both an unanticipated rate and to a degree of mental/physical/spiritual/emotional health that I never imagined was possible.  Because of the amazing experiences that I had from the very beginning, I was immediately invested in making floating an integral part of my life and started a regular, twice a week, floating practice.


    Any cool experiences floating that you want to share?  

    The most delightful experiences that I have had floating has been in the after effects.  While I continue to hope that I will have experiences like Dr. Lilly had, his experiences do not mimic mine at all.  Most of my floats are extremely boring by comparison.

    At the same time, the effects that I have had are profound! The dreams that I have had reflect the tremendous, cataclysmic, psychological shifts that I have experienced through shedding unhealthy layers of myself and cultivating/re-connecting to other parts of myself. Since I began floating, I have lost over twenty-five pounds, resumed my long lost yoga practice and quit drinking alcohol completely. This is the first year that I have snowboarded in twelve years and I feel like a kid again, playing in this gigantic playground of life.  

    My life has become extraordinary and I know that floating has played an instrumental part in allowing this to manifest within me.


    Any tips, tricks, or advice you would share with other fellow floaters or Zen Tent owners?  

    The only tip that I would share with others is to float, regularly. It’s too easy to make excuses and miss the opportunity to float today.  

    Once I made floating a priority and scheduled it, so it was a planned part of my day, it became integrated into and enhanced the flow of my life instead of just being another box on my ‘to do’ list. In my opinion, there is nothing more important or divine than to connect with and become your ‘Deep Self!’


    Posted on November 25, 2015 and filed under Floating Success Stories.

    4 Ways to Keep Calm Under Stress When You Can't Float It Out

    We all experience certain levels of stress, whether it be at work, school, or within relationships. When we are feeling stressed, hormones like cortisol flood our systems, sometimes known as the "fight or flight response." Your heart goes up, you begin to breathe more heavily...any of this sound familiar?

    Sometimes stress is unavoidable but what really matters is how you handle it. 

    One of the best ways to cope with stress is by floating. However, if you're stressed out at work or on vacation, you may not have access or even time to float. With that in mind, here are 4 ways to deal besides just floating, so you can effectively keep your stress levels in check:


    1. Take A Deep Breath or Five

    Sounds really simple, we know, but according to, abdominal breathing for 20 to 30 minutes each day will reduce anxiety and reduce stress. Deep breathing increases the supply of oxygen to your brain and stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, which promotes a state of calmness. Breathing techniques help you feel connected to your body—it brings your awareness away from the worries in your head and quiets your mind. Not to mention, it's free and easy to do anywhere!

    2. Walk It Out

    Entering a more 'zen' mindset could be as easy as taking a walk in the park, according to a small study by scientists at Heriot-Watt University in the U.K. The study found that walking through green spaces can put the brain into a meditative state and can trigger "involuntary attention" mening that it holds attention while also allowing for reflection. Also, a number of studies have also shown that spending time outdoors relieves stress. Next time you're feeling stressed, try walking it out. 

    3. Put Away the Technology

    The ability to text, email, call, or instant message a friend or family member at any given time is a great luxury, but it also causes increased stress levels. And get this: the average American spends roughly 4.7 hours on their phone each and every day. So do yourself a favor and try to unplug from that tiny little screen for awhile. 

    4. Visualize & Meditate

    Visualization is the act of imagining yourself in a peaceful and safe environment - a place that makes you relaxed and happy. Here are some great tips for practicing visualization:

    • Go to a room where you will not be interrupted for 20 minutes.
    • Close your eyes.
    • To relax, take several deep abdominal breaths.
    • Focus on your breathing as you relax.
    • Search online for a guided meditation or audio of your choice 
    • If you choose to visualize on your own without audio, think of a restful place you have enjoyed or would like to visit. Picture it in your mind. Imagine how you would experience it through each of your senses. Hold that visualization for several minutes.
    • At the end of the session, take a minute or two to return slowly to a less stressed-out reality.


    While all of these methods of relaxation techniques very well, we still recommend to anyone who experiences stress to try incorporating a more regular floating practice into daily life. This is because in a float tank tank your dopamine levels instantly rise, making it easier and more natural for your body to overcome stress. Not to mention that this feeling typically lasts a couple of days, sometimes longer, so it's extremely effective for managing stress on a long-term basis. 

    At the end of the day, there is no one relaxation technique that is best for every single person but it's important to make sure you consider your specific needs and preferences when it comes to choosing a technique. The right technique is the one that resonates with you the most truly elicits your body's natural relaxation response. 


    Posted on November 4, 2015 and filed under Health & Wellness.

    Community Post: My Best Advice For Someone's First Float

    When it comes to floating for your first time, it may not be as relaxing for you as it is for others. A lot of this comes from fear or discomfort with the process and it's completely normal. Not to mention that if you do a search for "sensory deprivation" online, it can return some surprising and even frightening results. 

    So, we asked our community of floaters, home floaters, and float centers what their best advice would be for someone's first float. Because you can't knock it until you try it. Here's what they had to say:

    My best advice for someone's first float is________________.Comment with your best advice and tag someone you that you think might benefit from floating! #WellnessWednesday

    Posted by Zen Float Company on Wednesday, August 26, 2015

    Responses from our community:

    "Leave your ego, expectations and desires behind. Know that floating is like any other worthwhile mode of self care - you get better at it with time. Your first float may be amazing, or it may just be something you need to get out of the way. Even if you don't enjoy your first experience at all - give it a second and third chance. The tank will win you over in the end, and the benefits are worth it." -Fadeaway Floatation Center 
    "Pee! Even if you don't think you have to! I also recommend starting with a shorter float until you get used to it. 90 minutes was too long for me." -Lauren Acklin 
    Since most first floaters will be skillfully instructed by a float center staff member 1) listen to all of their advice and, I agree, 2) go in with zero expectations...just "be" and consider that simple act a success after your float...anything else that comes along for the ride, is just a bonus to be grateful for. Oh yes...and your first float doesn't really count as a float haven't truly floated until your 3 or 3) be sure to book them before you leave. wink emoticon. And once you're hooked....4) visit Zen's site, hook yourself up with your own on-demand, at-home float and save money on float center visits. gas, and time." - Tim M. Hoefer 
    "Spend some time figuring out how to get comfortable. Do not worry about achieving anything on the first float." - Caleb Fawkes
    "Go the the bathroom first, even if you don't think you have to!!!" -Randall Peterson 
    "Don't touch your face! Ever!" -Blake Norfleet 
    "Dry your face before you get in the tank after you shower." -Chris Coyle 
    "Leave your expectations in the shower." -Nicholas Trietsch 
    "Let GO and surrender to what happens next." - Benny Kong 
    "It's okay to be curious about your 'self'" -Bryan Phillips 
    "Let go" -Michael Musa 
    "Relax the neck, be water smile emoticon" -Gaynor Longden 
    "No shaving of any kind prior to. I don't consume any fluids an hour prior and make sure I go to the bathroom just before getting in regardless. And for me I also don't consume any food at least 2 hours prior. That works for me." - Joe Roberts 
    "I agree with making sure you pee before going in! Also...float 1 is throw away, don't judge floating on your first float. It takes a few to let the darkness and water relax you, replenish you & show you the way. Never touch your face, but if you do just grab that water bottle ASAP to spray the salt away." -Wendy Kesinger Kuhn 
    "Have something in mind to think about. Then the tank will laugh at you and show you what you really should be thinking about." -James Miller 
    "I agree with the Don't touch your face, 
    2. Don't go in with too much expectation of yourself to come out with some great revelation or life changing moment, just let those expectations go and see what happens
    3. Journal about it afterwards
    4. Relax your neck, it's ok to let it go, your head won't go under!"  -Sara Lord 
    "Don't expect anything. The float will give what it wants.


    Don't touch your face" -Dustin Mark Dee 
    "No expectations, everybody is different! Don't take anything in but curiosity and a sense of wonder at the prospect of feeling weightless! Bliss!" -Lynn Taylor 
    "Trust the water" -Donavan Suwanapal 
    "Bring neck support." -Darcey Olsen 
    "Be yourself" -Cari Klenk 

    Surrender your body by relaxing every muscle and letting the water take all of your weight- especially around your neck and shoulders. Feel that you are fully supported. 

    Surrender your mind by allowing thoughts and memories to drift through like clouds, without expectation, resistance, or attachment." -Michelle K Lange
    "Give yourself time after the first float to come back to earth. Thankfully, my sister (who commented above) was a pro so I was able to talk to her afterwards. Also, its ok if it takes time, like 30 min, to slow your mind. Be patient with yourself and relax. Its like a womb of joy and relaxation that you never want to leave. -Jenny Kesinger-Patton 
    "No expectations." - @richypocket
    "Keep your face dry. Be still. No expectations." -@floatuniverse
    "Every time you feel like getting out don't. Force yourself to stay in and focus on your breathing. Slow it down, in and out of your nose into your lower belly/diaphragm. This will help you disappear and quiet yourself to another level." -@handsomhairless
    "Trust the water. Relax into it as if you were trying to sink into your bed. Let go with every muscle. -@pismokitty
    "Make sure you keep your helmet on, otherwise you may run out of oxygen. KIDDING! Everything above plus if your neck starts to ache, make sure you push it back so the water nears your brow line, stretch it, use your hands as a pillow (or use pool noodle/neck pillow). Enjoy the amazing instant experience of the water supporting you and as it's your first float, play. There are no rules." -@cocoonfloatation

    Big thanks to everyone in our community for their participation and feedback! We got tons of great advice that hopefully will help newbie floaters have a better first time experience. 


    If you're new to floating and want to find a float center near you, please visit

    To find out more about our affordable home float tank please visit here


    Posted on October 29, 2015 and filed under Floating Tips & Tricks.